Aelink - an independent program linking facility for the IBM 360
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Aelink - an independent program linking facility for the IBM 360 by C. B. Mason

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Published by Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Research Establishment in Lucas Heights, N.S.W .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • IBM 360 (Computer) -- Programming.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby C. B. Mason [and] D. J. Richardson.
SeriesAAEC/TM 494
ContributionsRichardson, D. J., joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC770 .A996 no. 494
The Physical Object
Pagination4 [2] p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4972599M
LC Control Number76462909

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