Magnetic flux structures in superconductors
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Magnetic flux structures in superconductors by R. P. Huebener

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Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Superconductors.,
  • Magnetic flux.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementR. P. Huebener.
SeriesSpringer series in solid-state sciences ;, v. 6, Springer series in solid-state sciences ;, 6.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC612.S8 H83
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 259 p. :
Number of Pages259
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4738271M
ISBN 100387092137
LC Control Number78031408

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The book is intended for researchers and graduate students interested in the subject of magnetic flux structures in superconductors. It may serve as supplementary material for a graduate course on low-temperature solid­ state physics. Soon after the book went out of print. However, it continues to be widely used and quoted, and due to the ever growing interest in "Magnetic Flux Structures in Superconductors", a second edition is now being made available. An extensive new chapter gives a comprehensive review of developments relevant to high-temperature superconductors. Magnetic flux structures in superconductors. Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: R P Huebener. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students interested in the subject of magnetic flux structures in superconductors. It may serve as supplementary material for a graduate course on low-temperature solid state physics.

This book constitutes a standard reference for those who work in scientific and/or technological aspects of type II superconductors. It reviews in a quite condensed fashion a great deal of the present knowledge on the vortex state of type II superconductors, although it does not include the -intensively explored-mixed state of HTc materials.4/5(1). Magnetic Flux Structures in Superconductors | This second edition has been brought up to date by the inclusion of an extensive new chapter on aspects relevant to high-temperature superconductors. The new edition provides researchers, engineers and other scientists with an introduction to the field and makes useful supplementary reading for graduate students in low-temperature physics. Magnetic flux structures of finite superconducting networks To cite this article: Masaru Kato and Osamu Sato Supercond. Sci. Technol. 26 View the article online for updates and enhancements. Related content Nucleation of superconductivity and vortex matter in superconductor ferromagnethybrids A Yu Aladyshkin, A V Silhanek, W. COVID campus closures: see options for getting or retaining Remote Access to subscribed contentCited by:

Publisher Summary. This chapter discusses superconductors—the materials characterized by certain magnetic electrical and other properties. Fundamentally, a superconductor can be defined as a conductor that has undergone a phase transition to a lower energy state below a transition temperature in which conduction electrons form pairs called Cooper pairs, which carry electrical current without. magnetic properties of Type I1 materials is in order. Although all super­ conductors are diamagnetic and strongly oppose the entry of magnetic flux into their interiors, Type I1 superconductors permit limited flux penetration in the form of flux quanta or fluxoids. The fluxoids can be visualized [ 41 as. Introduction to The Theory of Superconductivity (PDF 82P) This note covers the following topics: introduction, superconducting transition, the london model, meissner effect, phase coherence, magnetic flux quantization, coherence length and the energy gap, critical currents and magnetic fields, condensation energy, critical currents, quantized vortices, basic concepts, vortices in the. “magnetic field” instead of “magnetic flux density”. Since the magnetic fields of interest (also those within the superconductor) are generated by macroscopic currents only, we do not have to distinguish between the magnetic field H and the magnetic flux density B, except for a few cases.